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Full Pink Moon Update for April 15, 2014, 12:42 AM PDT

April 14, 2014
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Here’s another update from SMBAS Blog on that large, disc-shaped, shining object which has frequently and mysteriously appeared in our nighttime sky this year (known to many as the moon).

Our Moon (T. Hinnebusch 2/14/14)

The Moon as seen from Earth (T. Hinnebusch 2/14/14)

April 15, 12:42 a.m. PDT — Full Pink Moon.   The grass pink or wild ground phlox is one of the earliest widespread flowers of spring.  Other names were the Full Sprouting Grass Moon, the Egg Moon, and —among coastal tribes —the Full Fish Moon, when the shad come upstream to spawn. In 2014 this is also the Paschal Full Moon; the first full moon of the spring season.

The first Sunday following the Paschal Moon is Easter Sunday, which indeed will be observed five days later on Sunday, April 20. This full moon will also undergo a total lunar eclipse  for which we have a ringside seat, as it occurs in the early morning hours. Totality will last almost 78 minutes. [Photos of a Total Lunar Eclipse]  The next lunar eclipse will be 8 October, 2014.

The next significant full moon will occur on May 14, 12:16 p.m. PDT.   Keep an eye on this spot for late-breaking news on this unprecedented event.

Have a nice moon photo?  Send it to us at: misclists [AT] verizon [DOT] net, along with name to credit and time/location of photo.

This information comes to you courtesy of: http://www.space.com/24262-weird-full-moon-names-2014-explained.html
written by Joe Rao.   Joe Rao serves as an instructor and guest lecturer at New York’s Hayden Planetarium. He writes about astronomy for Natural History magazine, the Farmer’s Almanac and other publications, and he is also an on-camera meteorologist for News 12 Westchester, N.Y.

But that’s waaay too long to type in, and besides, you don’t need to go there because SMBAS has done the work for you!
[Chuck Almdale]

Paramount Ranch to Malibu Creek State Park Wildflowers & Birds Walk: 12 April, 8 AM, Field Trip Reminder

April 10, 2014
Golden Current closeup  (J.Kenney 4/15/12)

Golden Current closeup (J.Kenney 4/15/12)

Saturday, 12 April, 8 AM. Paramount Ranch to Malibu Creek State Park Wildflowers & Birds Walk.
On this special and increasingly popular treat, California Parks docent and native plant specialist Peggy Burhenn will lead us on a 1-way, 4-mile, approximately 4-hour hike. Mostly level with one larger down slope. Starting at Paramount Ranch (free parking!) we’ll pass through former President Reagan’s Ranch featuring meadows, Chumash relics, riparian areas, streams, abundant wildflowers, typical extraterrestrial artifacts, singing birds and wonders galore! Bring water, sturdy shoes and lunch. We will arrange to have a couple of cars waiting (parked) at the end of the walk to carpool us back to the beginning.

Rabbit (J. Waterman 4/6/13)

Rabbit (J. Waterman 4/6/13)

Links to previous trips:  April 2013April 2012, April 2011, April 2010March 2009
Link to Mapquest Map: http://mapq.st/fLzjkU

Hooded Oriole female (J. Waterman 4/6/13)

Hooded Oriole female (J. Waterman 4/6/13)

Family Guide: Suitable for everyone who can hike 4 miles at a normal pace with frequent stops to look at stuff. About 2 miles path, 2 miles dirt road.
[2813 Cornell Rd. Agoura, CA 91301] From Las Virgenes Rd – Mulholland Hwy intersection, Paramount Ranch is 2.3 mi. west on Mulholland, then 0.2 miles north on Cornell Rd to park entrance. From Hwy 101, exit #36, Kanan Rd., south 0.5 mi to Cornell Way, left 0.1 mile to Cornell Rd & continue 2.3 miles to park entrance.
Meet at 8:00 a.m. Coordinator: Chuck Almdale (818-894-2541)
[Chuck Almdale]

Coyote crossing  (J. Waterman 4/15/12)

Coyote crossing (J. Waterman 4/15/12)

Wilson Canyon Field Trip, 5 April 2014

April 7, 2014

It was cold when we started, but right from the parking lot we saw two Lewis’ Woodpeckers – one of the more difficult-to-find woodpeckers. Warmed by early success we took the right-hand path beyond the “Authorized Vehicles Only” sign and tramped up a canyon looking for our target Rufous-crowned Sparrow. It didn’t take long before we had a really great view of an adult. It hung around long enough that we regretted nobody had brought a camera on the trip.

We heard singing titmice, towhees and both “crowned” sparrows. Even with the small amount of rain, green grass was coming up beside the trail and a few wildflowers (yerba santa, deer weed, checkerbloom wishbone bush) as well.

Back down in the oak forests, which are extensive here, we found many Yellow-rumped Warblers, most of whom were still in drab winter plumage. The Orange-crowned Warblers were as bright as they can be, so somebody is confused about springtime. We found more Lewis’ Woodpeckers (or the original two were following us around), and Nashville and Black-throated Gray Warbler. The biggest concentration of hummingbirds was around a grove of tree tobacco (exotic) because, we assume, they were in full bloom.

Back at the parking area we saw White-throated (correction from first posting) Swifts flying at eye level and close up. All in all, a very nice walk, even though it’s obvious that the drought has affected the canyon.

Trip List:

Red-tailed Hawk.
American Kestrel.
Band-tailed Pigeon.
Mourning Dove.
White-throated Swift.
Anna’s Hummingbird.
Rufous Hummingbird.
Allen’s Hummingbird.
Lewis’s Woodpecker.
Acorn woodpecker.
Nuttall’s Woodpecker.
Pacific-slope Flycatcher.
Black Phoebe.
Ash-throated Flycatcher.
Western Kingbird.
Western Scrub-Jay.
Common Raven.
Hutton’s Vireo.
Bewick’s Wren.
House Wren.
Blue-Grey Gnatcatcher.
Bushtit.
Violet-green Swallow.
Ruby-crowned Kinglet.
Oak Titmouse.
Lesser Goldfinch.
House Finch.
Orange-crowned Warbler.
Nashville Warbler.
Yellow-rumped Warbler.
Black-throated Grey Warbler.
Common Yellowthroat.
Song Sparrow.
White-crowned Sparrow.
Rufous-crowned Sparrow.
Spotted Towhee.
California Towhee.
Hooded Oriole.

Total: 38

Paramount Ranch to Malibu Creek State Park Wildflowers & Birds Walk: 12 April, 8 AM, Field Trip Reminder

April 5, 2014
Golden Current closeup  (J.Kenney 4/15/12)

Golden Current closeup (J.Kenney 4/15/12)

Saturday, 12 April, 8 AM. Paramount Ranch to Malibu Creek State Park Wildflowers & Birds Walk.
On this special and increasingly popular treat, California Parks docent and native plant specialist Peggy Burhenn will lead us on a 1-way, 4-mile, approximately 4-hour hike. Mostly level with one larger down slope. Starting at Paramount Ranch (free parking!) we’ll pass through former President Reagan’s Ranch featuring meadows, Chumash relics, riparian areas, streams, abundant wildflowers, typical extraterrestrial artifacts, singing birds and wonders galore! Bring water, sturdy shoes and lunch. We will arrange to have a couple of cars waiting (parked) at the end of the walk to carpool us back to the beginning.

Rabbit (J. Waterman 4/6/13)

Rabbit (J. Waterman 4/6/13)

Links to previous trips:  April 2013April 2012, April 2011, April 2010March 2009
Link to Mapquest Map: http://mapq.st/fLzjkU

Hooded Oriole female (J. Waterman 4/6/13)

Hooded Oriole female (J. Waterman 4/6/13)

Family Guide: Suitable for everyone who can hike 4 miles at a normal pace with frequent stops to look at stuff. About 2 miles path, 2 miles dirt road.
[2813 Cornell Rd. Agoura, CA 91301] From Las Virgenes Rd – Mulholland Hwy intersection, Paramount Ranch is 2.3 mi. west on Mulholland, then 0.2 miles north on Cornell Rd to park entrance. From Hwy 101, exit #36, Kanan Rd., south 0.5 mi to Cornell Way, left 0.1 mile to Cornell Rd & continue 2.3 miles to park entrance.
Meet at 8:00 a.m. Coordinator: Chuck Almdale (818-894-2541)
[Chuck Almdale]

Coyote crossing  (J. Waterman 4/15/12)

Coyote crossing (J. Waterman 4/15/12)

Meet “the one who wrote the book”…on seabirds, that is.

April 4, 2014
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Larry Wan of the Wan Conservancy invites you to a friend-maker & fundraiser event at the G2 Gallery in Venice to hear and meet Peter Harrison, author of the authoritative SEABIRDS, AN IDENTIFICATION GUIDE. The speaker will focus on the Wan Conservancy effort to fund research on nesting of a number of Storm-petrel species in South America.

The event will be held on Monday April 27th from 6 to 9PM, and it is free; however you must RSVP to wanlarry719@gmail.com. For further information go to http://www.wanconservancy.org/pdf/WANConservancy_E-vite.pdf

Tricolored Blackbirds IMMEDIATE Action Needed

April 3, 2014

This was just passed to us from Garry George, Chapter Network Director at Audubon California:

This morning, we at Audubon California learned of a dairy in Madera with an estimated 25,000 to 50,000 Tricolored Blackbirds nesting in the dairy’s wheat fields.Call Kym Pietsch, CA’s Director of Development: (626) 390-2631
Or Link to Credit Card Payment: https://secure3.convio.net/nasaud/site/Donation2?df_id=1320&1320.donation=form1

The wheat where the birds are nesting is scheduled to be harvested this week in order to provide food for the dairy’s cows. The farm managers have consistently said that they have to harvest the field this week or they will have to send cows to the slaughter house for lack of forage crop to feed them. Our California dairies are all struggling financially, so we understand this reality. But right now, this farm is home to 25-50% of the entire Tricolored Blackbird population in their three-county stronghold. It’s the kind of harvest that could be devastating for the species.Call Kym Pietsch, CA’s Director of Development: (626) 390-2631
Or Link to Credit Card Payment: https://secure3.convio.net/nasaud/site/Donation2?df_id=1320&1320.donation=form1

We can save this colony, but we have to raise $40,000 in the next 24 hours to purchase food for the cows in order to do so.   Why is this important?  Because the Tricolored Blackbird is currently at risk for extinction.  We have seen the total population decline in recent years, with a critical 85 percent drop in colony size since 2006, as colony after colony has been mowed down while nesting.Please consider making an investment today in the future of these birds.  They urgently need your help.  You can call Kym Pietsch, our Director of Development, at (626) 390-2631 to make a gift or pledge over the phone, or if you have any questions.
Call Kym Pietsch, CA’s Director of Development: (626) 390-2631
Or Link to Credit Card Payment: https://secure3.convio.net/nasaud/site/Donation2?df_id=1320&1320.donation=form1
 
Thank you so much for all you do for birds and for being a partner in our efforts to save them.
Best regards,

Brigid McCormack

P.S.   I want you to know that saving this bird is an all-out effort for our team.  In addition to raising funds, we are working with our partners (farmers, agencies and other NGO’s) throughout the Central Valley to convince the farm to delay its harvest until the young Tricolored Blackbirds have fledged.  I’ll be sure to keep you up to date with our progress.

Call Kym Pietsch, CA’s Director of Development: (626) 390-2631
Or Link to Credit Card Payment: https://secure3.convio.net/nasaud/site/Donation2?df_id=1320&1320.donation=form1

 

Birders’ Bonus

March 30, 2014
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Many of you attend the regular California Native Plant Society weekend sales in Fall and Spring. The April sale this year has an added bonus, a 90-minute symposium on Botany for Birders by Mickey Long, noon to 1:30 on April 19th. Note that this event is a one-day only.

As usual, it’s held at the Sepulveda Garden Center and plants will be provided by the Theodore Payne Foundation. For full details go to http://www.lacnps.org

 

LucienP

Can We all Live Together? Least Tern and American Crow Interactions At the Venice Beach Nesting Area, with Dr. Peter Auger: Evening Meeting Reminder: Tuesday, 1 April, 7:30pm

March 28, 2014
Least Tern chick & egg (Stacey Vigallon 7/10/08)

Least Tern chick & egg at the Venice Beach tern colony
(Stacey Vigallon 7/10/08)

Endangered Least Terns have nested in the Venice Beach – Ballona Creek area for a very long time: on southern Venice Beach just north of the Marina del Rey main channel for over 30 years, and in what is now the Ballona Wetlands prior to that. As long as humans have been involved with this particular breeding population, predation by American Crows on Least Tern eggs and chicks has been a problem. Dr. Auger will report on research findings recovered at the Venice Beach Tern Nesting Area by his students, colleagues and himself.  The objective of the Venice Beach research is intended to develop a system of crow aversion to preying on tern eggs.

Crow snatching an egg from the Venice tern colony (Robert Jeffers)

Crow snatching an egg from the Venice tern colony (Robert Jeffers)

Dr. Peter J. Auger, Ph. D.
Based at his primary residence and Sandy Neck Field Station on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, Prof. Auger earned his undergraduate B.A. from Amherst College and his Ph. D. in Biology (Animal Behavior) from Tufts University.  He is teaching in the biology department at Loyola Marymount University for his second spring semester.

We continue to meet at Christine Emerson Reed Park, 1133 7th Street. (between 7th St. & Lincoln Blvd., California Ave. & Wilshire Blvd.), Santa Monica. Previously known as Lincoln Park. If you’re coming from outside Santa Monica, exit the #10 Fwy at Lincoln Blvd., turn north  and drive 5 blocks north to Wilshire Blvd.

Link to Google Map
Meeting Room: Mid-park in Joslyn Hall, accessible from Lincoln Blvd, California Ave. and 7th St.  Its glass wall faces north towards St. Monica Church on California St.  If you’re walking from Lincoln Blvd., it’s located directly behind (west) of the large Miles Playhouse building. Not accessible directly from Wilshire Blvd.

Meetings begin at 7:30 sharp with a little business, and then our main presentation. Refreshments are served afterward. 

Parking: The entire block between Wilshire and California Ave, 7th and Lincoln, on the sides closest to the park, is metered. Meter enforcement ends at 6PM, so free parking for the meeting!  We had almost 50 attendees in February and we know of only two people who couldn’t find parking. However, the local natives are engaged in a survival-of-the-fittest scramble for free parking, so the after-6pm free parking spaces disappear quickly.  We suggest that you arrive no later than 7:15 pm.

If all those spaces are filled, go south of Wilshire, not north of the park, as resident-only permit parking zones abound to the north. The east side of Lincoln Blvd. is also by permit parking only. We found plenty of spaces on 7th St. or Lincoln south of Wilshire. Most of those seem to be “until 6PM” meters also. Wherever you park, please read parking signs carefully and avoid a big fat $40+ parking ticket.
[Chuck Almdale]

To move or not to move?

March 27, 2014
by

We have received a member complaint about not finding parking at the Chris Reed Park evening meeting place. This leads us to believe there may be others with opinions about where we should meet in the future. Your Board will be discussing the possibilities at the annual summer planning meeting. (The Chris Reed Park room is already rented for May.) So please inform us as to your favored venue.

We had parking problems, narrow spaces, noise from other rooms,… at the Ken Edwards Center. At Reed Park we have only street parking and it gets harder to find after 7:15. All non-City subsidized sites we have investigated would cost between $10 and $20 per attendee and no member has offered to subsidize a better meeting place.
We look forward to your feedback. If you want to keep it private, please email me directly at plauzoles@me.com.

LucienP

Malibu Lagoon Trip Report: 23 March, 2014

March 25, 2014

BE SURE TO VISIT THE SLIDESHOW ON THE BLOG.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Elegant Terns flying (R. Ehler 3/23/14)

Elegant Terns flying (R. Ehler 3/23/14)

Perhaps it was the shift to daylight savings time, forcing us to arrive an hour closer to dawn, but the gulls, terns, pelicans and cormorants were on the beach and in the lagoon, unlike the last four months when most were out to sea and beyond viewing distance. This pushed our total bird count up to 51% above the running 6-year average for March (82% above the 10-year average). As is usual for this time of year, the weather was cooperative – 62-70° with little wind – and the large group of birders had a good time. Oddly enough, we saw not a single raptor, whereas we’ve had 2-6 species per visit since last October.

We’ve got another nice collection of photos from Randy Ehler in the slideshow on the blog. Randy has become a regular attendee on our lagoon walks and he always has his camera, for which I am very grateful, as I am too busy spotting birds, pointing out birds, counting birds, answering questions and moving people along to even try to take a decent photo.

Brown Pelican dodging waves (R. Ehler 3/23/14)

Brown Pelican dodging waves (R. Ehler 3/23/14)

Birds new for the season were: Long-billed Dowitcher, Caspian Tern, Elegant Tern (135!), Anna’s Hummingbird, Western Scrub-Jay, Rough-winged & Barn Swallows, Savannah Sparrow, and Red-winged Blackbird. The hummer and the jay are both year-round residents, yet we somehow managed to miss them for the past few months. Red-wings usually hang out across the street at Legacy Park, where they’re close to the food court where they can snag fries and burger bits from unwary eaters. The Savannah Sparrows were on the beach, gleaning bugs and whatnot (a scientific term) from the high-tide wrack. The Townsend’s Warbler was gone, but the three Meadowlarks were still there, now 6-months long. May they now qualify for residency and get a green card?

Marbled Godwit admiring its own reflection (R. Ehler 3/23/14)

Marbled Godwit admiring its own reflection (R. Ehler 3/23/14)

Our next three scheduled field trips: Wilson Canyon or Walker Ranch, 5 Apr, 8:30am; Paramount Ranch to Malibu Creek S.P. 1-way hike, 12 Mar, 8:00am; Malibu Lagoon, 27 Apr, 8:30 & 10am.
Our next program: Tuesday, 1 April, 7:30 pm. Urban Crows & predation on Least Terns: presented by Dr. Peter Auger.

NOTE: Our 10 a.m. Parent’s & Kids Birdwalk meets at the shaded viewing area.

Links: Unusual birds at Malibu Lagoon
Aerial photo of Malibu Lagoon from 9/23/02.
Prior checklists: July-Dec’11, Jan-June’11, July-Dec ’10Jan-June ’10, Jul-Dec ‘09, and Jan-June ‘09.

NOTE: WordPress (our blogsite host) recently did one of their periodic updates, following which many things won’t work properly for a while (or ever again in some cases). If this blog looks odd, blame them (or Canada, if you prefer).

Comments on Bird Lists Below

Total Birds: March total birds of 1564 is 51% above the 6-year Mar. average of 1034; for a change many gulls and pelicans were present as were many ducks, coots, and cormorants.
Summary of total birds from the 6-year average so far: Jun’12 +36%, Jul’12 -9%, Aug’12 -9%, Sep’12 +12%, Oct’12 +3%, Nov’12 -5%, Dec’12 +30%, Jan’13 -20%, Feb’13 -29%, Mar’13 -30%, Apr’13 -34%, May’13 -37%, Jun’13 -24%, Jul’13 +83%, Aug’13 +37%, Sep’13 +23%, Oct’13 +41%, Nov’13 -58%, Dec’13 -49%, Jan’14 -62%, Feb’14 -28%, Mar’14 +51%.
Species Diversity: March 2014 with 59 species was 6% above the 6-year Mar. average of 56.
Summary of species diversity from the 6-year average so far: Jun’12 -10%, Jul’12 +10%, Aug’12. -6%, Sep’12 -20%, Oct’12 +5%, Nov’12 +2%, Dec’12 -4%, Jan’13 +2%, Feb’13 -8%, Mar’13 +9%, Apr’13 -2%, May’13 +3%, Jun’13 +13%, Jul’13 0%, Aug’13 +11%, Sep’13 -14%, Oct’13 +19%, Nov’13 -3%, Dec’13 -6%, Jan’14 -2% Feb’14 +9%, Mar’14 +6%.
10-year comparison summaries are available on our Lagoon Project Bird Census Page.    [Chuck Almdale]
Note: Beginning July, we return to our pre-project bird list format, reporting the most recent 6-month period.

Malibu Census 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
March 2009-14 3/22 3/28 3/27 3/25 3/24 3/23
Temperature 50-60 70-80 54-61 51-54 60-75 62-70
Tide Lo/Hi Height H+4.8 H+5.48 L+0.05 H+3.64 H+4.90 L+.39
Tide Time 0728 0840 1216 1146 0806 1010 Birds
Gadwall 18 16 32 18 13 25 20.3
American Wigeon 4 14 3 31 8.7
Mallard 16 12 30 24 28 19 21.5
Cinnamon Teal 4 0.7
Northern Shoveler 2 8 18 2 5.0
Northern Pintail 1 5 1.0
Green-winged Teal 4 1 10 11 4 5.0
Lesser Scaup 1 0.2
Surf Scoter 10 18 8 5 6.8
Bufflehead 1 0.2
Red-brstd Merganser 3 1 4 2 12 7 4.8
Ruddy Duck 11 15 20 55 23 20.7
Red-throated Loon 2 2 0.7
Pacific Loon 5 15 3 1 4.0
Common Loon 1 1 1 0.5
Pied-billed Grebe 1 1 4 2 1.3
Horned Grebe 1 0.2
Eared Grebe 1 0.2
Western Grebe 12 27 20 1 22 13.7
Blk-vented Shearwater many 0.2
Brandt’s Cormorant 2 1 1 1 0.8
Dble-crstd Cormorant 36 42 90 30 15 45 43.0
Pelagic Cormorant 1 1 1 0.5
Brown Pelican 170 184 89 40 35 390 151
Great Blue Heron 1 2 1 1 2 1.2
Great Egret 2 1 1 1 2 1.2
Snowy Egret 10 7 5 12 5 8 7.8
Green Heron 1 0.2
Blk-crwnd N-Heron 1 0.2
Turkey Vulture 3 2 0.8
Osprey 1 0.2
Cooper’s Hawk 1 0.2
Red-shouldered Hawk 1 1 0.3
Red-tailed Hawk 2 2 2 1 1.2
Merlin 1 0.2
Virginia Rail 1 0.2
Sora 1 1 4 1.0
American Coot 85 92 153 20 170 104 104
Blk-bellied Plover 24 25 7 3 9.8
Snowy Plover 36 25 42 14 33 5 25.8
Killdeer 3 1 2 2 6 2.3
Black Oystercatcher 2 2 0.7
American Avocet 7 1.2
Spotted Sandpiper 1 1 1 1 1 1 1.0
Greater Yellowlegs 1 0.2
Willet 4 4 3 3 16 4 5.7
Whimbrel 3 1 18 28 5 9.2
Marbled Godwit 12 2 12 4 5.0
Ruddy Turnstone 12 2 2.3
Sanderling 6 1.0
Western Sandpiper 15 2 2.8
Least Sandpiper 2 14 20 20 9.3
Long-billed Dowitcher 5 0.8
Boneparte’s Gull 2 4 1.0
Heermann’s Gull 4 4 155 27.2
Ring-billed Gull 25 2 50 8 25 18 21.3
Western Gull 70 48 100 30 35 190 78.8
California Gull 180 27 1100 12 30 135 247
Herring Gull 1 0.2
Glaucous-wingd Gull 11 1 1 1 2.3
Caspian Tern 1 2 5 3 1 2.0
Forster’s Tern 1 0.2
Royal Tern 3 8 1.8
Elegant Tern 22 47 4 2 135 35.0
Black Skimmer 3 0.5
Rock Pigeon 4 4 2 25 4 6.5
Mourning Dove 2 2 0.7
Blk-hooded Parakeet 4 0.7
Anna’s Hummingbird 2 3 2 1 1 1.5
Rufous Hummingbird 1 0.2
Allen’s Hummingbird 2 3 4 5 4 3.0
Belted Kingfisher 1 1 1 0.5
Black Phoebe 6 6 12 5 8 6.2
Say’s Phoebe 1 1 0.3
Cassin’s Kingbird 1 0.2
Western Kingbird 2 2 16 3.3
Western Scrub-Jay 1 1 1 0.5
American Crow 6 4 6 3 8 6 5.5
Rough-wingd Swallow 30 3 2 6 12 20 12.2
Tree Swallow 8 1.3
Barn Swallow 1 1 12 2.3
Oak Titmouse 1 0.2
Bushtit 4 4 4 5 6 3.8
Bewick’s Wren 1 1 1 0.5
Northern Mockingbird 2 2 1 2 7 2.3
European Starling 20 8 16 15 9.8
Ornge-crwnd Warbler 7 1.2
Yellow-rumpd Warbler 2 5 8 1 18 5.7
Common Yellowthroat 2 1 3 1 4 1.8
Spotted Towhee 1 0.2
California Towhee 2 1 2 3 1.3
Savannah Sparrow 5 7 2.0
Song Sparrow 6 8 12 13 8 14 10.2
White-crwnd Sparrow 3 5 2 1.7
Red-winged Blackbird 2 6 2 12 3.7
Western Meadowlark 3 0.5
Brewer’s Blackbird 1 0.2
Great-tailed Grackle 7 4 1.8
Brwn-headed Cowbird 2 3 0.8
House Finch 4 6 20 19 2 11 10.3
Lesser Goldfinch 3 4 4 28 6.5
Totals by Type 3/22 3/28 3/27 3/25 3/24 3/23
Waterfowl 74 70 99 101 115 110 95
Water Birds-Other 307 354 376 91 234 566 321
Herons, Egrets 11 12 7 14 7 12 11
Raptors 3 2 6 0 6 0 3
Shorebirds 113 87 71 65 92 35 77
Gulls & Terns 313 133 1270 53 94 643 418
Doves 4 6 4 0 25 4 7
Other Non-Pass. 5 6 8 0 11 5 6
Passerines 91 53 94 62 89 189 96
Totals Birds 921 723 1935 386 673 1564 1034
  2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014  
Total Species 3/22 3/28 3/27 3/25 3/24 3/23
Waterfowl 11 7 6 8 6 7 7.5
Water Birds-Other 7 8 11 4 11 9 8.3
Herons, Egrets 2 4 3 3 3 3 3.0
Raptors 2 1 3 0 5 0 1.8
Shorebirds 12 9 7 7 6 9 8.3
Gulls & Terns 7 8 9 4 6 8 7.0
Doves 1 2 2 0 1 1 1.2
Other Non-Pass. 3 2 4 0 4 2 2.5
Passerines 15 14 18 9 19 20 15.8
Totals Species – 101
60 55 63 35 61 59 56

 

 

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